Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Tuesday's Treasures & Things

Today's treasure reminds me of my mother. And her smoking habit. It sat on the fireplace mantel in our home, always filled with cigarettes. Both my parents smoked and I must have been addicted even before I picked up my first cigarette.


My Dad never stopped smoking and died of lung cancer at the age of 66. That was a wake up call for me. I was 31 at the time and I had a horrible, addicted, relationship with cigarettes ever after until I finally stopped when I was 53. The only good thing about this bad relationship with my addiction was that I smoked a lot less than I had before my Dad passed. This constant battle went on for more than 20 years. And it happened when a lot of people still smoked and you could smoke just about everywhere. I know that made it more difficult for me to stop. 


My Mom tried to quit also, but was not successful either. And I tried and tried. I still remember late night excursions to the 7/11 to buy cigarettes when I just couldn't stand it any longer. 
Then I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 49 and  knew I had to stop. And I still couldn't. Finally, they came out with Nicorette gum, the first quit smoking aid. In the beginning my health insurance covered the cost and that, combined with the No Smoking laws and guidelines that were  implemented at the time, helped me to finally successfully quit. I quickly became addicted to the Nicorette gum, however, and continued to chew and chew for another three years. Then I guess I finally realized that the gum wasn't necessary any longer. Phew!


What I find most interesting now is that no matter how stressed I am, no matter what kind of bad things happen, I never ever think of smoking. For a long time after I quit, I thought I could always get some Nicorette gum if I felt like smoking. But I never did. Even with this background story, I enjoy having this pretty little dish in my home and thinking of my Mom when I look at it.

28 comments:

  1. Like you both my parents smoked and I struggled to quit (that is putting it mild) but at 48 years old I found out I was going to have a grand daughter and I didn't want to pass it down to her....I never thought I would be a non-smoker and when I see someone smoking I thank God that I was able to quit and be free of it.

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  2. My parents smoked and I always hated it -- so I never smoked. Good for you for quitting. I took care of my mother-in-law in her last awful year of dying from emphysema -- a terrible price to pay for addiction.

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  3. Wow. I'm so glad I never smoked. (Besides when my brother handed me a cigarette for one puff when I was about 4 or 5 yrs old). I'd hate to battle that addiction.

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  4. It is believed the true addiction to nicotine might have a genetic component. Some people can stop cold turkey and that is that. They believe they are not truly addicted.

    You overcame great odds, most certainly.

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  5. Good Morning, Inger!
    I had only heard about one other person being addicted to the nicotine gum (besides myself), there is hope for me yet! I still am, but finally it's going down. I have "graduated" to the 2mg. I know it's not good for me either, but better for my lungs. I think when I finally get rid of all my teeth, that will be "it"!
    Have a beautiful day!

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  6. I'm glad you quit, and I, too, know first hand how hard it is. I quit in the mid-eighties, when I was in my 30's. And there were too things that helped me quit.

    I had a little male parakeet and, one day, I noticed he was making this unattractive sound that I soon realized was his imitation of me coughing. And, I got into horses and needed the money for the horses instead of for my addiction. I quit cold turkey, but, boy, you didn't want to be anywhere near me for a couple of months after I did.

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  7. If nothing else the price of cigarettes should get people to quit now. I smoked when younger,quite cold turkey and then started again after I lost TJ. Now I only smoke 3 or 4 a day so should really just go ahead and quit again.

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  8. My dear sister had the addictions in the family. She was born some 21 years before me and smoked and drank from age 18. She died of her smoking and only was able to quit drinking a year before her death. Addictions are very sad and things we cannot help others with.

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  9. I am having a cigarette as I read this. I have tried to quit many times but it is soooo difficult. I am 76 years old & luckily have had no smoking-related problems but I AM going to try to quit again soon.

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  10. SO VERY GLAD YOU QUIT!! So proud of you :)

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  11. Inger, glad you were able to stop especially living out there with all that fresh air!!!...:)JP

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  12. Proud of you for quitting. I've never had a cigarette in my mouth (so glad I never had to quit!), so I can't really relate to the difficulty. My niece also just quit; I was so happy for her.
    That's a beautiful little dish. It's nice that it reminds you of your mom - no matter what she did with it!

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  13. So proud of you for quitting, Inger. I've read where there's a genetic link so pat yourself on the back. But keep the ashtray (which doesn't look like one in the photo) and think of the good times.

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  14. I love the dish! How hard it must be to stop smoking!! I never did smoke, but I've known many who have and have seen them stop/start/stop. Good for you, Inger!! I'm sure you feel accomplished in having quit that bad habit. And you are probably so much more healthier...

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  15. Inger,
    Congratulations to you for quitting. We still smoke. I've made one, seriously meant, attempt many years ago. Came down with a serious, clinical depression in the process, where I couldn't see any light in the end of the tunnel.

    Made another attempt, but that wasn't really for ME, I was doing it for somebody else. Used Nicorette nasal spray and that was really good. That could actually have worked, had not 'the other person' kept picking on me for the spray -- he found that to be cheating. We fought so hard so I began to ask myself about the quality of life...

    When one really has the inner WILL to quit, then you can, no matter what.

    I was surprised to see a few smokers here in the comments ... we're a threatened species.

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  16. Addictions to things can be so very strong. Glad you kicked it!:)

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  17. good for you in breaking the habit! never tried it myself. always found my parents smoking to be rather stinky. thankfully dad quit about 15 years ago, and mom finally caught on two years ago. i guess it's difficult to quit when everyone around you at the casino is smoking! ;o)

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  18. Funny thing about addictions -- I think no matter who you are -- you have one or two. So glad you were able to finally quit, Inger. I bet you feel 100% better now than you did back then. :)

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  19. Hello Inger! I have never smoked, but have to tell you that my Father did, and to this day, I still love the smell of a cigarette as it's being lit--I've wondered if I was addicted...But I admire you for quitting!! I've had several friends who struggle with it. While the 'aids' to get rid of it have improved, I know that it's still a battle!

    I hope you've had a good day!!

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  20. I'm so glad you quit smoking, Inger. My brother smokes and has struggled to quit but hasn't been able to. It is so hard for him.

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  21. Really well done, Inger!
    I have never smoked because in junior high our school showed us a movie (american!) called "Bob's last cigarette". It basically showed a full lung operation where they removed this lung that was dripping with tar. It scared me so much that I have never even considered trying to smoke! So in some cases the scare tactics do work :-)
    To my great sorrow my son has smoked for the last 10 years, but recently he became an uncle, and his sister told him beforehand that he wouldn't get near the baby if he smelled of cigarette smoke. So he stopped cold turkey 2 months before the baby arrived.
    The right motivation is very important!

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  22. I have never smoked but I think it must be one of the hardest things to quit..I know a couple of people who can do absolutely anything if they set their minds to it but they can not / will not quit smoking...I have always felt this way about drugs...never tried them because i knew I would probably like them...

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  23. So happy for you that you stopped smoking...and interesting that such a lovely, nature scene held cigarettes. :-)

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  24. Amazing what stories our 'treasures' bring forth! Good that you quit Inger! I quit back in 1970!!! Glad I did.

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  25. Love the dish-and isn't it wonderful that you don't even miss smoking now : )

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  26. Thank goodness I never took up the addictive habit of smoking. My dear mom smoked a bit and yet when she tried to quit she had a real hard time over many years to completely give it up. In the place where I grew up over 90% of the people smoke. They still do. I was glad to get to the big city where hardly anyone I know smokes. I detest it when I am on the street corner or go into a public building and have to walk through a cloud of smoke first but I realize that smokers have to do it somewhere and they can no longer do it in buildings. there are laws around how far you have to be from the access doorways to smoke but most people ignore these.

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  27. Hugs to (((Inger))) You did it! That is a major accomplishment and we rejoice with you that the urge is gone :)

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Thanks for leaving a comment.. ~~ Inger

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